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22nd Jan, 2018
Blog, House Plan of the Week

Featured House Plan of the Week, Richmond 11-048, Spanish Home Plan, Southwestern House Plans

The Richmond blends traditional and present day Spanish styling in a plan that is also elegant and informal. Traditional elements include a tile roof, arched windows, and stucco. Bold columns, a cameo window and planters overflowing with vegetation provide contemporary flare.

Vaulted ceilings offers a sense of openness in the formal living spaces found in the core of this plan. Widely spaced columns support plant shelves define the boundaries of dining room, living room and hallways. A small powder room, tucked into the passageway to the kitchen, is close to to it all.

Day to day activities take place in the large, open family room/kitchen. The diagonal cooking island creates a uniquely shaped kitchen. A vegetable sink across from the range offers increased efficiency in food preparation.

The eating bar adds more counter space. Utilities and a walk-in pantry are conveniently located between the kitchen and the garage. On the far side of the kitchen, a glass door in the nook leads to a screened porch that opens onto a terrace.

Bedrooms are close together on the left. Luxury amenities in the owners' suite include a large walk-in closet, a private bathroom with two vanities and a private toilet and shower. Glass blocks form the shower stall and brighten the bathing alcove.

Each of the secondary bedrooms have direct access to a jack-n-jill bathroom. The bedroom closest to the entry porch could be outfitted with French doors and used as a den or office.

15th Jan, 2018
Blog, House Plan of the Week

Featured House Plan of the Week, Kersley 30-041, Classic Home Plan, Luxury House Plan

 

The Kersley's arched windows and lofty entry, keystones, corner quoins and a steeply pitched hip roof create an impression of statuesque grandeur in this Classic-style home design.

Inside, a graceful curved staircase sweeps up the right side of a wide, bright foyer that features a two-story ceiling and a hardwood floor. Arched openings lead to the formal living room, dining room, and the informal family living spaces are at the rear. Most of the main floor has 9-foot ceilings.

The fireplace in the living room is its center piece and the French doors and tray ceiling augment the sense of refinement. The dining room, with its coffered ceiling, hardwood floor and built-in buffet, is equally elegant. Family room, nook and kitchen are all open to each other. A pool room is off to the left, through raised panel doors. Roomy and bright, this area has a wet bar and sliding glass doors that open on a large patio.

In the family room, another fireplace adds color and warmth. The entertainment center houses electronic toys¬--big screened television, CD player, Blu ray,  or video games. Kitchen conveniences include a spacious walk-in pantry and a large work island with a cook top.

All four bedrooms are upstairs. Owners’ suite luxuries include a large walk-in closet, dual vanities, soaking tub, and oversized shower. The guest suite has its own bathroom, complete with shower. The other two bedrooms share a jack-n-jill bathroom.

7th Jan, 2018
Blog, House Plan of the Week

Featured House Plan of the Week, Duplex Plan, Multifamily Plans, Cartersville 60-017

The Cartersville is a two-story, three-bedroom Craftsman-style duplex design with bathrooms on both levels and plenty of separation between the units. The only shared walls are between the garages, powder rooms and patios. Each unit is mirror image of the other.

Slender wooden posts trim a welcoming front porch large enough to accommodate a porch swing or other patio furniture. The front railing adds privacy and nostalgic charm.

Step inside, you move through the entry into the living room. A coat closet is straight ahead, across from stairs that lead to the second-floor bedrooms.

The kitchen and dining room are linked at the rear, with a peninsular counter and raised eating bar between them. Counters wrap around three sides of the kitchen, while cupboards line two, and fill the space above the refrigerator as well.

Laundry appliances, a powder room, and garage access are steps away.

Wide windows at the rear and side of the dining room allow for plenty of natural light. Sliding glass doors provide easy patio access, and can be left open to increase air circulation in summer.

Three bedrooms are upstairs. Two are in the front and the owners' suite is at the back. While it shares the upper bathroom, it does have a private dressing area with a basin, and a roomy walk-in closet.

1st Jan, 2018
Blog, House Plan of the Week

Featured House Plan of the Week, Country Home Plan, Pine Hill 30-791

Country-style Pine Hill makes an ideal retreat cottage, and is equally well suited for year-round suburban living. Wooden shutters and a wrap-around front porch add nostalgic charm.

Light flows into the entry through sidelights that flank the door. The stairs directly ahead of the entry lead up to the three bedrooms and two bathrooms on the second floor.

On the first floor, four linked family living areas wrap around the staircase. The entry is open to the living room on the right, and a den on the left. A fireplace serves as a focal point on the living room's exterior wall.

A wide arched opening links the living room to a dining room that is expanded by a window bay. Sliding glass windows there access a large deck, down a few steps from the main floor. The dining room is open to the kitchen, where a large work island adds to the counter and cabinet space. 

Around the corner is a good-sized utility room and a powder room. In the utility room, cabinets line the wall above the appliances. The hallway leading to these rooms ends with an exterior door that leads out onto the covered porch and then on to the patio. 

The owners' suite boasts a second gas fireplace, a deep soaking tub, and a dual vanity.

1st Jan, 2018
Articles, Blog

Two home design gurus walk you through a home that needs a little updating. They show you some ideas such as how to put the finishing touches on a refurbished kitchen or a new window treatment. In the process, you see high-tech renderings of the home as it will be when all the updates are finished. Digital graphics and illustrations flash across the TV screen and you start to think to yourself, “Wouldn’t it be great to have those same visuals for the new home I want?”

It seems so simple and so easy to get all the flash and tech for a construction project on reality home improvement shows. In just a few days or at the click of a button, designs are there in 3-D with virtual walk-throughs … but that’s not reality. The reality is that the design portion of your construction project will take more time and consideration than they show on TV, and any high-tech graphics will be costly. 

“Reality home improvement shows aren’t based in reality at all,” said Rick McAlexander, CEO of Associated Designs Inc., in Eugene, Ore. “From a design perspective, watching these shows makes you think that the design and all its pieces are done right there while you are walking through the house together. But it doesn’t work like that.”

In reality, construction or home design projects are built around 2-D drawings, blueprints, and hand sketches. They are a time-consuming endeavor that takes weeks if not months to finalize. Designers take you through all the solutions, exploring every possible amenity, material, and layout to bring you the home of your dreams. Even a small townhome can be a complex project taking hours if not days of iterations and solution gathering. TV can make the construction process look like a snap. From concepts to permits to finished product, it’s all done in a matter of weeks.

“There’s this illusion of a design being done at the push of a button, as if I’ve done it instantaneously, which is not possible,” said McAlexander. “It takes hours, weeks, and even months to put all those ideas onto paper. High-tech graphics are cool, but even all the data needed to input into the computer to make those graphics is complex and time-consuming, not to mention costly.”

That doesn’t mean that the technology isn’t there to use high-tech graphics like the ones shown on reality TV. It most certainly is possible to have a 3-D rendering of your new kitchen – if you can afford it. What is hidden in the world of television is the amount of time it takes to generate those graphics and 3-D walk-throughs. You ultimately spend more time and money on creating the pretty picture than on the value of the project itself, said McAlexander.

“And this is a familiar discussion at a lot of home design firms,” he continued. “Clients walk in expecting to see a high-tech digital design with all the trimmings, and they want to see it now. If they were available as efficiently as they are portrayed in reality home improvement shows, I would advocate for them 100%. I would much rather be able to show my clients these 3-D models of the design solution and give them a virtual tour of their new home because it does help people visualize the design. But again, it’s not a simple click of the button.”

Time and costs play a factor in any construction project, but so do budgets. There’s only so much the typical homeowner is willing to spend on the design of a new home or a remodel project, and it’s usually much more tame compared to what is discussed on reality home improvement shows. On television, suppliers get special consideration. When they sign the dotted line, they know they will also get promotional exposure by virtue of their products being used on the show. The costs, therefore, are downgraded.

“There is a disconnect when it comes to budgeting for a project like the ones they show on TV,” said McAlexander. “The budgets on TV, in my opinion, are laughable because they are not steeped in reality. The actual cost of materials, design elements, fixtures, and those high-tech graphics, can be hefty. Every little detail counts.”

Reality home improvement shows are not all bad. You can still watch them and be inspired. The biggest opportunity they provide is for you to see a wide range of styles and features that you can consider for your next construction project. That unique pantry or bathroom update may be just what you’re looking for in your dream home.

Simply keep in mind those bells and whistles that make great TV have not truly found their way to the reality of current construction.

“The more time you give the design process, the happier you will be with the results,” said McAlexander. “By taking time to analyze your lifestyle and living patterns with a design professional, the space you create will serve you well in the years to come.”

As seen on Newswire

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